Medical Imaging Center

Located on the first floor, the Medical Center's state-of-the-art Medical Imaging Department is completely digital and provides an essential component of patient care. Medical lmaging is considered the "eyes" of medicine, providing an inside look at a patient's anatomy to help physicians provide appropriate care.

Hours:

In-Patient Care/Emergency Department 24 hours 7 days a week
Outpatient Hours 7 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Friday
For more information, call 909-580-1520.

Services include:

  • Two CT units: A 64-Slice CT scanner, equipped with a bariatric table allowing for patients up to 660 pounds and 3D imaging stations to enable coronary screenings on patients with chest pain; and a second spiral CT.
  • Radiation oncology with Image Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (I.G.IMRT), a precise method of external beam radiation therapy that delivers high doses of radiation directly to the tumor while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue.
  • Two MRI 1.5T units: A short-bore MRI with a large opening, to handle claustrophobic patients and patients up to 500 pounds; and a second MRI that is a standard 1.5T unit.
  • Two interventional radiology labs for special procedures such as stents, angiograms, angioplasties and other interventional radiology procedures.
  • Bone densitometry low-dose system.
  • Two state-of-the-art digital mammography units and available supine mammography biopsy unit for patient comfort (mobile service).
  • Two nuclear medicine units, including one for hearts.
  • Ultrasound department.
  • PET Scan available through a mobile unit.
  • Diagnostic imaging exam services done with state-of-the-art computed radiography or direct capture system.
  • State-of-the-art (PACS) Picture Archiving Communication System. Medical Imaging is completely filmless.
  • Medical Imaging is staffed by all board certified radiologists (M.D.'s) and all registered and certified technologists in every modality.
  • American College of Radiology accreditation in Mammography, CT, Nuclear Medicine, MRI, and Ultrasound.
Speak Up!: X-rays, MRIs and other medical imaging tests

X-rays:

  • What is it? Uses a small amount of radiation to take pictures inside your body
  • Used for? Diagnosing broken bones, pneumonia, dental problems. Mammograms are a common type of X-ray used to help diagnose breast cancer.
  • What happens? You may be asked to lie still on an X-ray table or sit or stand by the table. You may wear a lead apron to protect certain parts of your body.
  • Fact: The amount of radiation you get from an X-ray is small. For example, a chest X-ray gives out a radiation dose similar to the amount of radiation you're naturally exposed to from the environment over 10 days.

Ultrasound

  • What is it? Uses sound waves to create an image. Does not expose you to radiation.
  • Used for? Diagnosing conditions of the heart, blood vessels, kidneys, liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, a health care provider uses an ultrasound to look at the baby.
  • What happens? You lie on a table. The person giving the test places gel and a device called a transducer on your skin. The transducer sends out sound waves that bounce off tissues inside your body.

CT or CAT scan (computed tomography)

  • What is it? Uses special X-ray equipment to take pictures that show a “slice” of your body
  • Used for? Diagnosing broken bones, cancer, blood clots, abdominal conditions, internal bleeding
  • What happens? You lie still on a table and may have to hold your breath for a short time. The CT machine is aimed at the part of your body the health care provider needs to see. For some CT scans you may receive a “contrast dye,” which makes parts of your body show up better. The dye may be given through an intravenous (IV) tube or a syringe in your arm. Some dye is given in a drink.

MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)

  • What is it? Uses a large magnet and radio waves to look inside your body. Does not expose you to radiation.
  • Used for? Diagnosing torn ligaments, tumors, brain or spinal cord conditions, examining organs
  • What happens? You lie still on a table that slides inside a tunnel-shaped machine. You may have to hold your breath for parts of the exam. For some MRI scans you may receive a “contrast dye,” which makes parts of your body show up better. The dye can be given through an intravenous (IV) tube or a syringe in your arm. Some dye is given in a drink.

Tell your health care provider if you fear small or enclosed spaces, or if you have:

  • Metal in your body, such as shrapnel, a bullet, artificial joints or stents
  • Electronic devices in your body, such as a cardiac pacemaker or implanted pump
  • Body piercings with metal that cannot be removed
  • Ever been a welder

Nuclear scans

  • What is it? Uses radioactive substances and a special camera to see inside your body. These scans can show how organs, such as your heart and lungs, are working.
  • Used for? Diagnosing blood clots, cancer, heart disease, injuries, infections, thyroid problems
  • What happens? Before the test, you receive a small amount of radioactive material, which makes parts of your body show up better. The material can be given through an intravenous (IV) tube or a syringe in your arm. Some is given in a drink and sometimes you inhale it. You wait as the material is absorbed by your body. This may take an hour or more. Then you lie still on a table while the camera takes images.

Speak Up! was provided by: www.jointcommission.org

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